UNL student works on second bachelor’s degree

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With a population of 60 people, what was a 10-year-old boy to do in Mahaska, Kansas?
“We disappeared in the wilderness for hours and usually weren’t done until someone was bleeding,” Colin Sinn said about his play time with friends.
Sinn grew up sword fighting with sticks and occasionally breaking some bones along the way. He was the kid parents could rely on to not only work hard, but play hard.
It was almost expected of Sinn to hurt himself regularly. He broke each of his collarbones, once by tripping on his shoelaces that he never tied, and then picking a fight with an older and much bigger friend of his brother’s. 
“I guess reckless would be a pretty good word,” the 27-year-old said of his childhood.
But growing up on a farm proved to be less painful.
Sinn watched his dad work, harvesting crops and tending to the hogs, but was always told to go outside and play. His only tasks as a kid were to spray the thistles and whack down Juniper trees with some loppers. Each tree down was a nickel in Sinn’s pocket.
When he entered his 20s, his profits turned into a bachelor’s degree in biology.
Now working on his second bachelor’s degree — this time in journalism — his work ethic never ceased.

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