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What happened to Ever Given

What happened to Ever Given

Three weeks after stranding in the Suez Canal, where it was stuck for six days, the Ever Given anchors at Great Bitter Lake, one of the open spaces of the canal. It cannot be removed because it was seized by the Egyptian authorities while awaiting approval for compensation in favor of Egypt due to the damages caused by the blockade. There are still 25 Indian crew members on board.

A spokesman for the company that owns the Japanese ship, Shuy Kisen Keisha Ltd., explained that the ship was blocked by an order from the Egyptian court, and the kidnapping by the authorities was compared to arrest. Osama Rabie, head of the Suez Canal Authority. He said The required compensation is $ 900 million, and includes the cost of relief operations, damage to the channel’s banks, and lost profits during the six-day blockade. Rabih also said that the owners of Evergiven “do not want to pay anything.”

Instead, the ship owner claimed that it had made an offer, without specifying its value, and that it was negotiating in good faith. However, she did complain about the request from the Suez Canal Authority, which was deemed too high and too few details. According to the information I gathered Wall Street JournalShoei Kisen Kaisha insurance coverage is coming Reaches 3.1 billion Dollars.

Discussions about compensation also hinge on investigating the cause of the ship’s delinquency in the Suez Canal, and thus determining who was responsible for the accident. Egyptian authorities said they would release new details of the investigation by Thursday.

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Also read: Why did you ever drift geffen?

Initially, the ship’s captain blamed the high winds, which caused the boat to skid until it was set sideways, occupying the entire width of the canal and preventing the passage of other ships. Meteorological data on that day confirmed, last Tuesday, March 23, the possibility that winds – with gusts of up to 40 knots, around 70 km / h – may have influenced the accident, but the thesis did not convince everyone.

According to some experts, who relied on monitoring the course of the Evergreen, the ship was traveling at a great speed: 13 knots (about 25 km / h) against the maximum permissible in the 8.6 channel (about 16 km / h), and for this it ran aground. It was also said that this speed was reached specifically to try to counteract the force of the wind, but the situation worsened, because the size of the ship at that point would have rendered it unmanageable.

A pilot working for the Suez Canal Authority, an unidentified endowment, told me Washington Post The two pilots on board the Evergreen have more than 30 years of experience and that the problem was not that of them but of how the ships crossing the canal were manufactured, which in recent years has become very large and difficult to manage: “Ships today are bigger than they were in the past. This is something new, never seen before, ”the pilot said, arguing that with winds of 30 or 40 knots, it is easier for ships of this size to veer off the ground.

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In his statements, Osama Rabie tried repeatedly to assert that there was no responsibility on the part of the channel authorities or Egypt; In fact, many have expressed skepticism about this, given that when a ship enters the Suez Canal, there is an obligation on two pilots of the Egyptian authority to get on board and oversee the lane.

Ever Geffen ran aground in the Suez Canal on March 23rd They were released Only after six days, the losses were estimated between 5 and 8.5 billion euros in international trade. Roughly 7 percent of the world’s commercial traffic passes through the Suez Canal, which was built more than 150 years ago.

Also read: History of the Suez Canal