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Photos of the Apollo missions as we've never seen them before: Revamped NASA photos

Photos of the Apollo missions as we’ve never seen them before: Revamped NASA photos

photo Apollo missions more sharp And the bright This never. Negatives, which constitute the indelible testimony of “A big step for humanityApollo missions completed by NASA have been stored in a freezer At the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Cameraman Andy Saunders He reformulated it “for the twenty-first century” as he explained to everyone guardianwho first released the photos, and is preparing a book about them, coming out in September: Apollo remastered. Specifically, because the original negatives are so important, it’s very rare for them to leave the controlled temperature of a Houston freezer. This means that the images of Apollo and Twins It was always widespread until now Copies (copies) of the originals of the 1960s and 1970s. Continuous copying and reformatting of images without going back to the originals causes progress drop in quality Which becomes especially evident in the face of transformer brilliance. Below you can see the first released remastered images.

NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 9, March 7, 1969. Astronaut James McDevitt docks the lunar module. “A near-impossible mission,” as mission fellow Russell Schweickart, who took the photo, called it. – The picture is the cover of the book.
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 11, July 21, 1969 – Fellow missionary Neil Armstrong photographed Buzz Aldrin just minutes before their historic lunar walk.
NASA / Andy Saunders (Digital Source Stephen Slater) | Apollo 13, April 15, 1970 – Fred Hayes tried to sleep in the cold lunar module
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Gemini XIII, November 11-15, 1966 – Buzz Aldrin takes first selfie in space
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 8, Dec 24, 1968 – Earth rising, Earth rising, taken by William Anders during the first manned ‘lunar orbit and back’ mission, as defined by NASA
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 9, March 6, 1969 – David Scott photographed his reflection on Russell Schweickart’s eyebrow
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Gemini IV, June 3-7, 1965 – The first human-to-human photo was taken in space. Ed White leaves the spaceship immortalized by James McDevitt
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 16, April 23, 1972 – Charles Duke family portrait left on the sands of the moon
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 17, December 13, 1972 – Harrison Schmidt noticed a crater immortalized by Eugene Cernan
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 16, April 23, 1972 – John Young collects moon dust immortalized by Charles Duke
NASA / JSC / ASU / Andy Saunders | Apollo 15, August 2, 1971 – One of the best known images of the Apollo missions: James Irwin salutes the American flag immortalized by David Scott

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