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Peru, Parliament impeaches President Pedro Castillo

Peru, Parliament impeaches President Pedro Castillo

The former president was seen leaving the government headquarters with his family in the minutes in which Parliament approved a motion of no confidence in him. Castillo, who had gone to headquarters Lima province For claiming personal guarantees, he was arrested “in the act”, for dissolution of Congress, in violation of the Constitutional Charter.

Congress met after the president himself ordered the dissolution of the assembly, in what was called a “self-coup”. Parliament voted on the impeachment with 101 votes in favour, compared to the 87 votes needed for the dismissal to be effective. “In the course of performing its duties prescribed by law, the Peruvian National Police arrested former President Pedro Castillo,” a statement read.

The political situation came to a head when Castillo, in an attempt to prevent parliament from voting to impeach a third time, ordered Dissolution of the Legislative Council. However, neither the Constitutional Court nor the armed forces followed the president on this path.

So it was Castillo He was sentenced to ten days in prison For the assumption of various crimes, including a crime discord. In an official statement, the Public Prosecutor’s Office indicated that the charges against Castillo are for sedition, disturbing public order and an excess of power.

The newly elected President, Dina Boulwart A Appeal to “Unity of all Peruvians” and a “political truce” with the aim of “forming a national unity government”. In a speech that lasted more than ten minutes, and after receiving the presidential mantle from Parliament Speaker José William, Peru’s first female president affirmed that “I take office aware of the enormous responsibility that rests with me.”

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He said with “deep conviction” that “it is necessary to resume the path of economic growth, social inclusion and political reform that the country needs.” The first measure – he continued – would be Addressing corruption in all its forms“Because this cancer must be removed.”

Boulwart then thanked “the Armed Forces and the National Police, which have proven themselves to be a pillar of democracy and I ask them to have confidence in the process we are embarking on.” The chief’s last words were reserved for her to remember her words humble origin And a willingness to commit “so that” no one “and the excluded have a role once again in the country.”