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History of the ATP Finals: From 1970 to Today, Everything You Need to Know

Here we are, one of the most anticipated moments of the year has finally arrived: the moment Turin ATP Finals. The eight best tennis players in the world (including Matteo Berrettini) will compete for the title of Maestro. This tournament has been a fixture since 1970, but over time it has undergone countless changes. Let’s find out more!

ATP Finals History

As we have said, throughout history, the Masters Tournament has gone through various upheavals. The changes relate to the way the title, deck, location, and naming are set. Let’s start from the origins.

Ways to run the tournament and award the title

The first two titles with total points are awarded to the winner in one round. Then we moved on to Round Robin. Between 1982 and 1985, the direct elimination mode was tested (12 and then 16), only to return to the Round Robin for economic reasons. From 1986 until today, the formula has remained unchanged.

Sites and surfaces

Prior to landing in Turin, the ATP Finals had 16 different locations and were held on any surface except clay:

Japan Tokyo 1970 (artificial)
France Paris 1971 (artificial)
Spain Barcelona 1972 (artificial)
United States Boston 1973 (artificial)
Australia Melbourne 1974 (erba)
Sweden Stockholm 1975 (synthetic)
United States Houston 1976 (synthetic)
United States, New York 1977-1989 (artificial)
Germany Frankfurt 1990-1995 (synthetic)
Germany Hannover 1996-1999 (Synthetic concrete)
Portugal Lisbon 2000 (hard)
Australia Sydney 2001 (Cemento)
China Shanghai 2002 (Saab)
United States Houston 2003-2004 (Saab)
China Shanghai 2005-2008 (interior and concrete)
UK London 2009-2020 (hard interior)
Italy Turin 2021-2025 (internal concrete)

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denomination

Throughout its history, the tournament has been called in different ways: Masters Grand Prix (1970-89), ATP Tour World Championship (1990-99), Tennis Masters Cup (2000-08) and finally the ATP Finals (from 2009 onwards).

ATP Finals Gold List: 25 winners

  1. Roger Federer: 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011 (6)
  2. Novak Djokovic: 2008, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 (5)
  3. Pete Sampras: 1991, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999 (5)
  4. Evan Lendl: 1981, 1982, 1985, 1986, 1987 (5)
  5. Eli Nastas: 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975[4)[4)
  6. John McEnroe: 1978, 1983, 1984 (3)
  7. Boris Becker: 1988, 1992, 1995 (3)
  8. Bjorn Borg: 1979, 1980 (2)
  9. Lleyton Hewitt: 2001, 2002 (2)
  10. Daniil Medvedev: 2020 (1)
  11. Stefano Tesepas: 2019 (1)
  12. Alexander Zverev: 2018 (1)
  13. Grigor Dimitrov: 2017 (1)
  14. Gustavo Kuerten: 2000 (1)
  15. Andy Morey: 2016 (1)
  16. Stefan Edberg: 1989 (1)
  17. Other Agassi: 1990 (1)
  18. Nikolaj Davydenko: 2009 (1)
  19. Jimmy Connors: 1977 (1)
  20. Hand Marble: 1976 (1)
  21. Stan Smith: 1970 (1)
  22. Michael Stitch: 1993 (1)
  23. David Nalbandian: 2005 (1)
  24. Alex Bildt: 1998 (1)
  25. Guillermo Villas: 1974 (1)

Where to see the ATP Finals on TV and Live

Sky is the holder of the live broadcast rights to all matches of the ATP 2021 Finals: satellite TV subscribers will be able to watch all matches on Sky Sport 1 and Sky Sport Tennis channels (201 and 205 for satellite and channels 472 and 482 for digital terrestrial). For the ATP 2021 Finals live broadcast, on SkyGo and NOW TV, it will be possible to watch all single matches of the tournament which are also broadcast by Sky. Furthermore, Rai Sport holds the rights to free broadcast for 3 years (2021-2023) of the best match of every match day. The selected match will be broadcast live on Rai 2 at 2 pm or 9 pm depending on the programme. Finally, SuperTennis will suggest one match per day in clear mode and show all behind the scenes of the event.

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