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'Do not search', anti-capitalist awakening of conscience

‘Do not search’, anti-capitalist awakening of conscience

Life on Earth is about to end, a giant meteorite is about to collapse. Scientists sounded the alarm, but the news did not interest anyone. The solution to the problem is there, but at the last moment, the president allows herself to be convinced by the billionaire businessman that new cutting-edge technology can stop the meteorite from creating a fortune for society.

The spoiler is not like that.

Never like this do not searchAdam McKay’s latest film deals with the apocalypse, a mirror of our current society. The film aims to provoke the viewer’s reflection on the reality that surrounds it, with a frustrating comedic connection and accusation of the entire cultural and political system (including the director himself making the film) of not being prepared to communicate an emergency. Indeed, the film tells the current climate emergency through a metaphor, using masks to describe entire areas of society: the president of the USA represents the entire political class, the billionaire capitalist businessman, scientist and doctoral student. It represents the entire scientific community.

The film is critical of society as a whole but not in a unilateral and cross-sectional manner; The enemy in the film is really one: capitalism.

The scientific community is represented by Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence, who are trying in vain to effectively communicate the alarm message of science, which is mocked and ridiculed by the media, becoming an opinion among opinions on social networks.

The media doesn’t seem to be interested in the media but rather pursue a greater vision by riding misinformation and turning news into entertainment.

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Of course, the political class too Not exempt from criticism. Meryl Streep, who plays the President of the USA, reassures the scientists and thanks them, but in the end she is not interested in tackling the problem because she is busy chasing the passing electoral consensus. The President of the United States, who represents the entire political class, is not as strong and powerful as she is usually represented: she is in fact subject to strong pressure from the billionaire businessman (played by Mark Rylance), the funder of the president’s election campaigns, and thus the owner of the superpower of political pressure.

The real power lies in the money.

In fact, the billionaire persuades the president to abandon the safe and scientifically validated solution, instead of transforming the meteorite with an experimental alternative, which seems to solve all problems: able to split the comet so that it does not cause harm, but also able to create well-being for all.

Jennifer Lawrence herself, after confronting Leonardo DiCaprio about the “solution” of the billionaire businessman, says: “They’ve discovered a lot of gold and diamonds and various other follies about a comet. So they’re going to let it hit the planet to make a bunch of super-rich people disgustingly richer.”

The billionaire, who was offended when described as a businessman, is actually interested in lithium and the rare metals on a comet in a way that is nothing but altruism, in an apparent reference to Elon Musk.

So the movie also mentions the issue of social justice And how important it is to strive first and foremost to achieve the well-being of the most affected communities, from the perspective of social justice.

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It is likely that the director’s goal is to create debate by making pop a topic that has always pushed him too far, immobilized, or bored. As a climate activist, I’m interested in the reaction of people who have seen the film: so I understand if the simplification has managed to get the message across, or if the message has been distorted, because the core of the climate crisis is in fact its core. complication. Whether the film left a sense of awe, fear, frustration, or awareness of the need to act and participate in change.

Personally, I’ve noticed that many people outside the climate activist “bubble” are liked, perhaps scared, but also interested in actively participating. As if they understood for the first time what BlaBlaBla By Greta Timberg and the urgency of the emergency.

Just in the past few days in my local Friday For Future Pistoia group, over 10 people have asked to participate in ongoing meetings and projects because they wanted to feel useful, and be part of the change.

This movie is a story that indirectly talks about the climate crisis for a large audience: just think it was released on Christmas Day, on Netflix, and thanks to an excellent cast.

As Amitav Ghosh said in great blindnessWe need more stories.

The climate crisis will never reach everyone with graphs and data. Stories transcend social bubbles, borders and walls: they connect people and make them reflect on their surroundings. If you’re a writer, artist, journalist, or teller, don’t underestimate the power of a good story. Help us tell the climate crisis because it already exists, it is already part of our reality and we activists will not go away without everyone’s help and support.

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