Privacy: It’s a challenge for public figures

Defining who is a public figure is crucial in today’s battle

The New York Times reports: There’s great debate over who is a public figure and what kind of privacy rights such figures have.  Courts have ruled that elected officials, athletes and actors are fair game when it comes to press coverage.

Get the full story: nytimes.com

 

Football coaches like Huskers’  Bo Pelini can’t expect privacy

Omaha World Herald columnist Matthew Hansen says: “When you are someone as famous as Bo Pelini, the world is listening. Even when you don’t want them to be. Even when that doesn’t seem fair.”

Read more: omaha.com

 

A celebrity’s overly public life reminds us that they’re human too

The Age columnist Wendy Squires says: “It is humanising, consoling and liberating for we, the consumers of these brands – because that’s what celebrities are – to know that maybe, just maybe, everything isn’t perfect in their world either. That their lives could be a tiny bit like our own.”

Get the full story: theage.com.au

Are politicians entitled to any privacy at all?

PBS reports: Politicians no longer have private lives in today’s media environment. Panelists discuss the impact.

Read more: pbs.org

Celebrities sue to protect the privacy of their children

Variety reports:  TV columnist Brian Lowry weighs in on whether children of celebrities deserve more privacy. “A recent effort has hinged on providing additional safeguards for celebs when accompanied by their children, with Halle Berry recently testifying before California’s legislature about the pending provision.”

Read more: variety.com

Relationship between celebrities, paparazzi gets physical

ABC News reports: Celebrities, at times, lash out at the intrusion of paparazzi. In one case, a brawl broke out in Malibu, Calif., after a photographer tried to take pictures of actor Matthew McConaughey surfing.

Get the full story: abcnews.go.com

Steven Tyler, other stars back privacy legislation

The AP reports: Celebrities are pushing legislation that would give them more privacy protection. Steven Tyler and Mick Fleetwood testified at a Hawaii legislative hearing to push one privacy bill.

Get the full story: huffingtonpost.com

– Links compiled by Haley Whisennand

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